Friday, April 19, 2013

Day Q: Qand

This April, I will be participating in the A to Z Blogging Challenge, writing about the A to Z of Iraqi Culture. Do give in your own two cents in the comments below and let me know if you have anything to add or something similar to share from your own culture.

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Here's a picture of two pieces of bride-purpose qand (literal meaning: sugar block)- a tradition that has found its way across the Iranian-Iraqi borders.

A marriage in Iraq typically goes through several events: from the formal proposal and engagement, the religious event, also called the Aqd (or the Contract) to the Henna Night before the wedding and then the actual wedding. Sometimes it doesn't stop at the wedding and there's still another function to celebrate a week's passing!

Each of these events have a set of customs and protocol to follow (as mentioned earlier, Iraqis live for customs), but perhaps the most traditional of these is the Aqd, where the bride and groom are officially asked for permission to marry each other by a religious scholar/ cleric.

The cleric begins by talking about marriage before he goes on to ask the bride for her permission. While he gives his speech, the bride is sitting down, and two young girls (usually the bride's sisters, cousins or close friends) hold a white piece of cloth over her head. A third woman, who must be happily married, rubs the two pieces of qand together over the cloth throughout the ceremony.

It is supposed to signify the happily married woman raining sugar over the bride for a sweet marriage.

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12 comments:

  1. D'awww. '...raining sugar over the bride for a sweet marriage' - that is so cute ^_^

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  2. Another wonderful post Ghadeer. Not Iraqi weddings, but I have attended Muslim weddings (obviously) in India, and they are almost the same with what you have written. Asking the bride first and stuff.
    Thanks for sharing

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  3. I LOVE your blog - thank you for teaching all of us -
    love & love,
    -g-

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  4. ps - I really like the new layout.
    -g-

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  5. Raining sugar is so nice. It is a side of Iraq that was hidden from all of us. So glad that you are writing about the culture of Iraq:) Thanks!

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  6. A sweet marriage, what a wonderful idea and goal to strive for.
    Katie atBankerchick Scratchings

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  7. Raining sugar over the bride for a sweet marriage is such a lovely concept. I hope it doesn't mess up her hair though!

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    Replies
    1. It doesn't! The sugar's rubbed over the cloth that's held over her head.

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  8. This is so sweet and yes, that pun was intended. I wish Muslim marriages in India also had this tradition. It definitely adds charm to the occasion.

    Beautiful Q post :)

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  9. Oh, I keep forgetting to congratulate you for choosing to be an accountant ! My father was an accountant too.

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  10. How interesting...definitely reinforces the seriousness and permanence of marriage.

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